Articles

  • Injection Injuries to the Hand and Fingers

    High-pressure tools, such as paint guns, are used in a wide number of industries and home improvement projects. Some of these high-pressure tools have tips that spray paint, oil, or chemicals from a gun-like tool. While efficient and effective, these tools can cause serious injuries, and often these injuries don't seem as severe as they really are.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • SLAP Tear of the Shoulder

    A specific type of injury to the labrum, or labral tear, is called a SLAP tear. SLAP stands for Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior. The SLAP tear occurs at the point where the tendon of the biceps muscle inserts on the labrum.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • Elbow Dislocation Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

    An elbow dislocation occurs when the upper arm and forearm get separated from their normal position. The bone of the upper arm (humerus) normally touching the bones of the forearm (the radius and ulna). When an elbow dislocation occurs, these bones are separated from their normal alignment.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • Ulnar Neuropathy of the Wrist and Elbow

    Impingement of the ulnar nerve causes a radiating pain or numbness in the pinky finger, ring finger, and edge of the hand. This is called ulnar neuropathy, which can be caused by two different conditions known as cubital tunnel syndrome and ulnar tunnel syndrome.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • What can cause shoulder pain?

    The shoulder is a very flexible joint that is made up of several tendons, ligaments, and muscles that all work together. Should pain can result from injuries, general wear and tear, and a number of inflammatory conditions.

    Source: Medical News Today

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  • Ulnar Nerve Injury

    The ulnar nerve is one of the major nerves of the upper extremity. Nerves are structures that allow information to travel from the brain to the periphery of your body, and nerves can also send messages back to the brain. Nerves in the upper extremity carry important information about sensations that you can feel, and movements that your brain wants your body to make.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • What is a Custom Orthosis?

    After an injury, surgery, or onset of certain conditions, your doctor may ask you to see a hand therapist. Your prescription for therapy might include the need for a custom orthosis, commonly referred to as a brace or splint.

    Source: ASSH Hand Care

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  • Getting a Grip on Arthritis-Related Hand Pain

    As pain becomes more regular and severe, it can affect a person’s ability to do everything from activities they enjoy – like golf or other forms of recreation – to those things they need to do just to get through the day, from buttoning a shirt to gripping a cup of coffee in the morning.

    Source: US News

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  • Why Are My Hands Numb?

    There can be many different causes for numb hands. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which is a condition involving a pinched nerve in the wrist, is one of the most common reasons. Typically, with this condition, you’ll feel numbness or tingling in thumb, index, middle and ring fingers.

    Source: ASSH Hand Care

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  • Torn Elbow Biceps Tendon

    Injuries to the distal biceps tendon are not uncommon. Most often occurring in middle-aged men, these injuries often occur when lifting heavy objects. Over 90 percent of distal biceps tendon tears occur in men.

    Source: Verywell Health

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  • Evidence Behind Injections on the Elbow, Wrist and Hand

    After reviewing corticosteroid injections of the shoulder region, we will now move distally down the arm and into the elbow, wrist and hand. This article will cover some of the randomized trials and reviews on corticosteroid injections for some of the most common issues that present to a sports medicine practice including lateral and medial epicondylitis, de Quervain’s tenosynovitis, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Source: Sports Med Review

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  • What you need to know about shoulder pain — and shoulder surgery

    The part of the body we call the shoulder consists of several joints that work with tendons and muscles to allow the arm to move in many directions. We can bowl a perfect game or reach the top shelf thanks to this system of joints, muscles and tendons. However, it is possible to overextend the shoulder and end up with pain. When your shoulder is painful, everyday life activities become difficult.

    Source: Chicago Tribune

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  • Researchers determine the rate of return to sport after shoulder surgery

    Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery. Time and ability to RTS is often difficult to predict and based on a myriad of variables, including the individual's severity of injury, the type of sport (overhead, collision, contact, recreational), the athlete's level of competition, compliance with the rehabilitation program and type of surgery.

    Source: Medical Xpress

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  • Young athletes with shoulder instability might benefit from arthroscopy

    Young athletes with shoulder instability are considered to be a high-risk group of patients following arthroscopic shoulder stabilization given the high recurrence rates and lower rates of return to sport, which have been reported in the literature. However, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego outcomes may be improved by proper patient selection and reserving arthroscopic stabilization for athletes with fewer incidents of pre-operative instability.

    Source: Eurekalert

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  • Why Do I Have Uneven Shoulders?

    Uneven shoulders occur when one shoulder is higher than the other. This can be a slight or significant difference and may be due to several causes. Luckily, there are steps you can take to bring your body back into balance and alignment.

    Source: Healthline

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  • What is a Flexor Tendon Injury?

    An injury to a flexor tendon is basically an injury to your muscle. The flexor muscles are the muscles that allow you to bend your fingers. These muscles are able to move your fingers through tendons, which are cord-like extensions that connect your muscle to your bone.

    Source: ASSH HandCare

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  • Are fast-pitch softball pitchers overdoing it?

    Baseball leagues often have fairly strict limits on how many innings pitchers can pitch or how many pitches a player can throw. But for girls playing fast-pitch softball, such guidelines are rare. Washington University sports medicine specialists have found that many pitchers aren't getting enough time to recover and are experiencing shoulder fatigue, pain, weakness and injury.

    Source: Medicine Wustl Edu

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  • 3 Common Congenital Hand Differences

    A congenital hand difference is a hand that is abnormal at birth. During fetal development, the upper limbs are formed between four and eight weeks of pregnancy.  During this time, many steps are needed to form a normal arm and hand.  If any of these steps fail, then a congenital hand difference can result. It is not uncommon for a child to be born with a hand difference.

    Source: ASSH HandCare

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  • Health Tip: Signs You Need Rotator Cuff Surgery

    The rotator cuff is a collection of tendons and muscles that surround the shoulder. It's common for athletes -- for example, baseball pitchers -- to injure this area. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons mentions symptoms that indicate surgery is needed:

    Source: HealthDay

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  • Trigger finger surgery: What to expect

    Your finger and hand may be sore and swollen for several days. It may be hard to move your finger at first. This usually gets better after several weeks. You may feel numbness or tingling near the cut, called an incision, that the doctor made. This feeling will probably get better in a few days, but it may take several months to completely go away. Your doctor will take out your stitches 1 to 2 weeks after surgery.

    Source: MyHealth.Alberta.ca

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  • What are hand cramps?

    Hand cramping can occur for many reasons and cause significant discomfort in some people. Often, hand cramps are caused by muscle spasms, which are described as an uncontrollable or involuntary muscle contraction. These spasms or contractions do not allow the muscle to become relaxed and can become excruciating in some cases.

    Source: Medical News Today

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  • A Meta-analysis of Corticosteroid Injection for Trigger Digits Among Patients With Diabetes

    The pooled data showed that patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and patients with non–insulin-dependent diabetes had worse prognoses after corticosteroid injection for trigger digit than patients without diabetes. Furthermore, the patients with insulin-dependent diabetes had a trend toward multiple digit involvement and much worse treatment outcomes than the patients with non–insulin-dependent diabetes. The authors conclude that more aggressive treatment, such as surgical intervention, should be considered for those patients expected to have high failure rates after injection.

    Source: Healio

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  • A Single-Incision Technique for Distal Biceps Repair Using a Flexible Reamer

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures are rare injuries that usually occur in middle-aged men. Most of these injuries are repaired acutely to restore preinjury function and strength. There is concern regarding the higher prevalence of certain complications with the double-incision technique. As such, the single-incision technique has also been studied to determine if it may produce superior safety and efficacy. In addition, the point of fixation may be created with either a rigid or a flexible reamer. The authors describe a technique that uses a single-incision cortical fixation achieved with a flexible reamer.

    Source: Healio

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  • Study looks at needles in treatment for shoulder pain

    According to a new study, the type of procedure used to treat shoulder calcifications should be tailored to the type of calcification. The results of the study will help interventional radiologists determine whether to use one or two needles for an ultrasound-guided treatment for a common condition called rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    Source: Science Daily

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  • American Manus Club for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH)
  • American Association for Hand Surgery (AAHS)
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)
  • American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)